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Monday, November 2, 2015

CRI Sneaks Programming Into US Midwave Radio


From Reuters:













Beijing’s covert radio network airs China-friendly news across 
Washington, and the world

By Koh Gui Qing and John Shiffman

Filed Nov. 2, 2015, 1:40 p.m. GMT

Part 3: The Chinese government controls much of the content broadcast 
on a station that is blanketing the U.S. capital with pro-Beijing progra-
mming. WCRW is part of an expanding global web of 33 stations in which 
China’s involvement is obscured.


BEIJING/WASHINGTON – In August, foreign ministers from 10 nations
blasted China for building artificial islands in the disputed South China Sea.
As media around the world covered the diplomatic clash, a radio station that
serves the most powerful city in America had a distinctive take on the news.

Located outside Washington, D.C., WCRW radio made no mention of China’s
provocative island project...[CONTINUE READING]


Monday, August 17, 2015

Postcards From Around The World: What Is A QSL Card?


















A QSL card is what a radio station (or amateur radio operator) will
send a listener as confirmation of a reception report. For example,
if I hear ham radio operator KP4X3 on my receiver, I'll send him or
her a letter or e-mail letting that operator know that I heard their
transmission. Normally, you would specify what date and time you
heard them and on what frequency. It is also common to state what
equipment you were using when you heard the transmission. Sending
this information to the radio operator helps the operator know how
far his or her signal is travelling, how well it can be heard and
whether any tweaks or alterations need to be made to the equipment.

In turn, the radio operator will send a "QSL card", which is often
a postcard, to the listener. This card serves to confirm that what
the listener heard was indeed correct, and that the information
submitted by the listener matches details of the transmission. 'QSL'
is radio code for "do you confirm receipt of my transmission?" or
"I confirm receipt"...[CONTINUE READING]


Friday, June 19, 2015

Voice of Vietnam QSL




On April 24th, 2015, I received the Voice of Vietnam in English in Fort Worth, Texas.
I heard them on 12005 khz, transmitted from Wooferton, UK (per ShortwaveSchedule.
Com) from 02:35 to 02:50 UTC. The following morning, I e-mailed a reception report to 
vovworld@vov.org.vn. Close to two months later, about four days ago, I received a QSL 
card in the mail acknowledging my reception. The front and back are shown below:





































Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Cuban Spy Numbers Station (HM01) On 11635 khz


While doing some shortwave listening on my back porch in Fort Worth,
TX recently (5/10/15), I came upon the well-known HM01 spy numbers
station from Cuba. This time I caught it on 11635 khz, at exactly 1800 UTC.
Signal quality was very good, but you can hear from yourself in the video
below. I listened on a Tecsun PL-380 with a 25-ft wire antenna, with cloudy/
rainy conditions.


video

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Shortwave Logs From Fort Worth, TX for April 2015


Country in brackets is the transmitter site and not  necessarily the 
country of origin, unless specified.  If two countries are in brackets, 
first one is transmitter site. After that, the date, time and frequency
in kHz is listed. All times in UTC and all stations heard on TECSUN 
PL-380 portable in Fort Worth, Texas, USA, with 25 foot reel wire 
antenna, on a first floor, unless otherwise noted.




















[SPAIN] 04/19/15, 2028, 17855 khz -- Radio Nacional de Espana
in Spanish. Male announcers call futbol game, teams unknown.
SINPO 33343; first time receiving REE on this frequency since
they "came back".

[USA] 04/19/15, 2030, 17790 -- Male announcer (I believe he said
his name was "Tim Taylor") preaches and prays in English. SINPO
45455, very good signal. Almost certainly RMI from Okechobee,
FL.

[CUBA] 04/19/15, 2031, 17730 -- Radio Habana Cuba in Arabic,
male(?) announcer reading presumably news. Thought at first it
might not be Arabic, as it sounded kind of off compared to what my
ear expected, but it is Arabic per Aoki schedule. SINPO 44344.

[USA] 04/19/15, 2034, 15000 -- WWV time station from Fort
Collins, Colorado. The usual, reception about average. SINPO
33233.

[EGYPT] 04/22/15, 0317, 9965 -- Radio Cairo in Arabic, coming in
very decently all the way from North Africa, for once! Middle-Eastern
sounding music with male vocal (?). Clapping heard at end of song,
which was immediately followed by tune from what seemed like diffe-
rent artist at 0320. SINPO 34333.

[BRAZIL] 04/23/15, 0308, 11780 -- Radio Nacional da Amazonia,
in Portuguese. Acoustic guitar music with male vocal. Really good
signal tonight even for this station, at times it almost sounded like it
could've been local AM radio. SINPO 44454, but sometimes as good
as 45545.

[UK/VIETNAM] 04/24/15, 0235, 12005 -- Voice of Vietnam in
English, transmitted from Woofferton, UK. News headlines by alter-
nating male and female announcers. Heavy accents left me unable to
understand much of what was being said, but picked up mentions of
a Cuba/EU meeting and the Iran nuclear negotiations. SINPO 43344.






Tuesday, March 31, 2015

New Frequencies and Times For Radio Exterior de España














Spain's shortwave broadcaster, Radio Exterior de España, has published new
scheduled and frequencies on its website. For us here in North America, REE
will be transmitting on 17855 khz, from 1800 to 2200 hours UTC on weekdays,
and from 1400 to 1800 hours UTC on weekends. The full listing (in Spanish)
can be seen here. Good to see this from a shortwave broadcaster that until
very recently was getting ready to shut down!


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Deutsche Welle Closing Kigali Transmitter March 28th
















Another one bites the dust, as Germany's Deutsche Welle will be shutting down
its relay site (their last one, actually) in Kigali, Rwanda. Apparently March 28th
is the final day of transmission from Kigali, so if you're never logged or QSL'd
this location, do so now! No budget cuts had been announced by DW, which
makes the closure somewhat of a surprise.


Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Shortwave Logs From Fort Worth, TX for 02/15/15

Country in brackets is the transmitter site and not  necessarily the 
country of origin, unless specified.  If two countries are in brackets, 
first one is transmitter site. After that, the date, time and frequency
in kHz is listed. All times in UTC and all stations heard on TECSUN 
PL-380 portable in Fort Worth, Texas, USA, with 25 foot reel wire 
antenna, on a first floor, unless otherwise noted.











[RWANDA/GERMANY] 02/15/15, 1828, 17800 khz -- Deutsche Welle
from Kigali, Rwanda, in Hausa language. Two males talk on unknown
subject. Decent signal for daytime, considering this is coming from 
East Africa. Listened for about five minutes. SINPO 33233.

[USA] 02/15/15, 1842, 15610 khz -- EWTN (Catholic) Radio transmitting
from Vandiver, Alabama. "Vatican Insider" program with female announ-
cer. Strong, clear signal with a little noise, as typical for this frequency. 
SINPO 44344

[CUBA] 02/15/15, 1845, 11635 -- Atencion Cuba spy station with short
set of numbers being read in Spanish by female ("tres, dos, ocho, 
siete, siete"), followed by data-like sounds for several seconds, then
more numbers, and so on. SINPO 45454, good signal. It seems like
Cuban spy activity hasn't slowed down since the beginning of thawed
relations with the US.

[USA] 02/15/15, 1858, 15825 -- Religious talk by male, then station ID
and new show at top of hour (Dr. James Blank [sp?]). Male prays while
female translates into Spanish. SINPO 44344. 



Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Postcards From Around The World: What Is A QSL Card?


















A QSL card is what a radio station (or amateur radio operator) will
send a listener as confirmation of a reception report. For example,
if I hear ham radio operator KP4X3 on my receiver, I'll send him or
her a letter or e-mail letting that operator know that I heard their
transmission. Normally, you would specify what date and time you
heard them and on what frequency. It is also common to state what
equipment you were using when you heard the transmission. Sending
this information to the radio operator helps the operator know how
far his or her signal is travelling, how well it can be heard and
whether any tweaks or alterations need to be made to the equipment.

In turn, the radio operator will send a "QSL card", which is often
a postcard, to the listener. This card serves to confirm that what
the listener heard was indeed correct, and that the information
submitted by the listener matches details of the transmission. 'QSL'
is radio code for "do you confirm receipt of my transmission?" or
"I confirm receipt"...[CONTINUE READING]

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Shortwave Logs For 1/29-1/30/15


Country in brackets is the transmitter site and not  necessarily the 
country of origin, unless specified.  If two countries are in brackets, 
first one is transmitter site. After that, the date, time and frequency
in kHz is listed. All times in UTC and all stations heard on TECSUN 
PL-380 portable in Fort Worth, Texas, USA, with 25 foot reel wire 
antenna, on a first floor, unless otherwise noted.


[CUBA] 01/29/15, 0410, 5025 -- Radio Rebelde in Spanish, with male
 and female announcer reading personal ads listeners have apparently
sent in from all over Cuba. Some looking for friendship, some looking
for men or women only. Reception was a bit noisy. SINPO 43344.

[CUBA] 01/29/15, 0413, 5040 -- Radio Habana Cuba in Spanish.
Latin music, with male announcer interrupting here and there. Recep-
tion much like Radio Rebelde: not great, not terrible. SINPO 43344.

[USA] 01/29/15, 0415, 5890 -- WWCR from Nashville, TN at 100
kw with good ol' Brother Stair ranting about the British Empire and
its evil (??). He then asks listeners for reception reports. 55455, very
good signal.

[VATICAN] 01/29/15, 0417, 7360 -- Vatican Radio in the Tigrinya
language of Eritrea and Ethiopia,  transmitting from Santa Maria de
Galera at 500 kw. Two males  talking, lots of noise and some inter-
ference. SINPO 43243.

[CUBA/CHINA] 01/29/15, 0420, 9790 -- China Radio International
in Cantonese, transmitted from Havana at 250 kw. Surprisingly bad
signal marred by interference and noise, unlike what I normally
receive on this frequency. Male announcer. SINPO 32233.

[GREECE] 01/30/15, 0100, 9420 -- Helliniki Radiophonia from
Avlis. Male and female talk in Greek. SINPO 33222.

[USA] 01/30/15, 0106, 8420 -- Ship-to-shore communication station
from Mobile, Alabama. Morse code usually heard on here, but
tonight just pulsing and other sounds. SINPO 33222.

[CUBA/CHINA] 01/30/15, 0108, 9580 -- China Radio Int'l from
Havana. Male announcer with news in English, mentions story of
Japanese hostage being held by Islamic State. 44344, good signal.

[BRAZIL] 01/30/15, 0112, 11780 -- Radio Nacional de Amazonia
from Brasilia at 250 kw. Latin music, followed by station ID and
chatter from male announcer in Portuguese. SINPO 43344.



Friday, January 23, 2015

New CEO For Agency That Runs US Shortwave




















From a Broadcasting Board of Governors press release:


WASHINGTON – Respected journalist and media executive Andrew
Lack was sworn-in today as the Chief Executive Officer and Director
of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, the federal agency that
oversees the five networks and broadcasting operations of U.S. intern-
ational media. Those networks include the Voice of America, Radio
Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio and TV Martí, Radio Free Asia,
and the Middle East  Broadcasting Networks.

Lack is the first-ever CEO of U.S. international media.  Creating the
position of a CEO has been a key objective of the agency’s governing
board and the Administration.

“We are at a unique time in the extraordinary history of this agency.
The 21st Century’s global war on information is increasingly threatening
to our country and our values,” said Lack. “I am lucky to join a great
group of journalists and news professionals spread across the globe who
care so deeply about our critical role in that battle.”

Lack’s selection follows an almost year-long search process that began
in October 2013...[CONTINUE READING]